"It's the ability, nay, the gift, to be able to love your enemy, to forgive love those who hate you and would do you ill," he explained to me.

A gifted musician, he became the acknowledge authority on the Armenian nations' greatest musical genius, Gomidas.

I remember visiting him two years ago, when he was in the initial stages of Parkinson's, and sitting silently for long minutes, waiting for him to speak. He had great difficulty finding the words until I broached the subject of his book on Gomidas.

The moment he heard the name, his face lit up and he launched into an impassioned discourse.

Manoogian was born on Feb 16, 1919 in a refugee camp near the sand-enshrouded Iraqi town of Baqoubah. As a child, he attended a school in Baghdad, the capital, that Armenians who had sought refuge from the Turkish massacres, had established.

Towards the end of his early schooling, tentative yearnings for something spiritually loftier became insistent, assailing his waking and sleeping hours, demanding satisfaction, and ultimately guiding him in the direction of Jerusalem.

He was ordained celibate priest in 1939 and remained in the city until 1946 when he traveled to the US, only to return a few years later.

Ten years were to pass before America called again. But this time he reached its shores as Primate of the Eastern Diocese of the Armenian church.

He was elected patriarch of Jerusalem on March 22, 1990.

Throughout his life, Manoogian garnered numerous honors and tributes, both from religious and lay institutions, among them the US Statue of Liberty Medal.

He was also chosen "Man of the Year" by "Religion in American Life." He nurtured a keen interest in ecumenical affairs and has been instrumental in helping maintain the spirit of brotherly relations between the various religious institutions in Jerusalem. (In the US, he had also served on the Board of the National Council of Churches of Christ).

Manoogian had dreams of not only revitalizing Armenian Jerusalem, but also of expanding and reinforcing the Armenian presence here. One of his most ambitious plans was to construct a hostel for pilgrims on land owned by the Patriarchate, but it never got off the drawing board - city hall had other plans of its own.

Manoogian will be remembered as a caring shepherd and reformer. Under his tenure, the Patriarchate workforce almost quadrupled: there were more employees within the confines of the Convent of St James, seat of the Jerusalem Patriarchate, than there were people living there.

And he made sure that paychecks were disbursed on time, a welcome departure from past practices.

When Manoogian arrived on the scene, he discovered chaos. His unrelenting efforts to instill a sense of order and accountability into Patriarchal affairs, have proved successful, to a degree.

"Much still remains to be done," as one clerical source confided.

A perennial diplomat, Manoogian meticulously maintained smooth relations with both sides of the political divide in the country. The aura of charisma that enveloped him and his standing in the Armenian world, could have very easily secured him the highest accolade the church could ever grant: Catholicos (supreme head) of All Armenians. But although he served as Locum Tenens following the death of Catholicos Vazken I, he felt he would never leave Jerusalem.

He was the son of a people that had endured and survived wars and cataclysms, but that had not learned to turn their heart into stone.

Manoogian will be buried on Oct 22, in the Armenian cemetery on Mount Zion, just outside the towering walls of the Old City, bare weeks after the Armenian church mourned another of its princes, Archbishop Aghan Baliozian, Primate of the Armenian Diocese of Australia and New Zealand.

Who will be the 97th Armenian Patriarch of Jerusalem?

No one will know, until election day. For now, as tradition demands, the residence of the 96th Patriarch has been sealed, guarding his secrets and his dreams.

His triumphs and tribulations remain public knowledge.

No related posts." />

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Armenian Patriarch of Jerusalem Passes Away: Apostle of the "Impossible Love"

October 13, 2012 Armenia, Australia, Diaspora, Music No Comments
Image 19485.jpg

13:04, October 13, 2012

From Arthur Hagopian

Jerusalem, Oct 12 – Clouds scud across the Jerusalem sky, carrying aloft with them the hopes and aspirations of the city’s tiny community of poets, artisans and dreamers, the Armenians.

As they pause in their daily labor to mourn the passing of their spiritual leader, Archbishop Torkom Manoogian, Armenian Patriarch of Jerusalem, many wonder what the future holds for them and for their church, the bastion of their national entity.

The death of the 93-year-old visionary who called himself, poetically, TAM or Shen-Mah, is bound to have a profound impact not only on the life and times of the Armenians of Jerusalem, but on the Armenian diaspora as well.

Armenians all over the world regard Jerusalem, the city of Christ, as their second holiest sanctuary after Etchmiadzin, although it wasn’t the quest for religious rejuvenation that first brought ancestors people to Jerusalem: they had arrived with the conquering armies of Tigranes II, a full century before the birth of Jesus of Nazareth.

They had stayed, settled and prospered, and bequeathed to this immortal city an invaluable legacy of ingeniousness, creativity and vitality. Jerusalem would never be what it is today without the variegated trove of Armenian contribution, among them the city’s first printing press and photographic studio.

When Manoogian ascended the throne of St James as the 96th Armenian Patriarch of Jerusalem, he reburnished and reinforced the indelible stamp Armenians have left on the city.

And following in the footsteps of illustrious predecessors like the legendary Baron Der and Gregory the Chainbearer, he set in motion a new era of glasnost and perestroika, qualities in dire need at the time.

Among his most memorable achievements are the computerization of the Patriarchate’s records, the overhaul of its filing, accounting and database systems and the renovation of dilapidated priestly quarters.

Caught up in the refreshing breezes his advent had launched, life in the moribund Armenian enclave, which occupies more than one sixth of the Old City, took on a new, invigorated meaning.

There was a feeling of almost tangible euphoria in the wake of his election, and there were many who wistfully wished he had come earlier to Jerusalem.

To keep the Armenian diaspora well informed about the Patriarchate and about Jerusalem, he set up a press office (and asked this correspondent to head it) which churned out a steady stream of articles, newsletters and press releases over the years.

Manoogian had come home. His destiny had driven him from the deserts of Mesopotamia to the golden domes of Jerusalem, on a journey of devotion and dedication, in the service of the Armenian church to which he gave his all.

A prolific writer, his most recent oeuvre was a translation of Shakespeare’s sonnets into Armenian.

But his favorite topic was what he called the “impossible love.”

“It’s the ability, nay, the gift, to be able to love your enemy, to forgive love those who hate you and would do you ill,” he explained to me.

A gifted musician, he became the acknowledge authority on the Armenian nations’ greatest musical genius, Gomidas.

I remember visiting him two years ago, when he was in the initial stages of Parkinson’s, and sitting silently for long minutes, waiting for him to speak. He had great difficulty finding the words until I broached the subject of his book on Gomidas.

The moment he heard the name, his face lit up and he launched into an impassioned discourse.

Manoogian was born on Feb 16, 1919 in a refugee camp near the sand-enshrouded Iraqi town of Baqoubah. As a child, he attended a school in Baghdad, the capital, that Armenians who had sought refuge from the Turkish massacres, had established.

Towards the end of his early schooling, tentative yearnings for something spiritually loftier became insistent, assailing his waking and sleeping hours, demanding satisfaction, and ultimately guiding him in the direction of Jerusalem.

He was ordained celibate priest in 1939 and remained in the city until 1946 when he traveled to the US, only to return a few years later.

Ten years were to pass before America called again. But this time he reached its shores as Primate of the Eastern Diocese of the Armenian church.

He was elected patriarch of Jerusalem on March 22, 1990.

Throughout his life, Manoogian garnered numerous honors and tributes, both from religious and lay institutions, among them the US Statue of Liberty Medal.

He was also chosen “Man of the Year” by “Religion in American Life.” He nurtured a keen interest in ecumenical affairs and has been instrumental in helping maintain the spirit of brotherly relations between the various religious institutions in Jerusalem. (In the US, he had also served on the Board of the National Council of Churches of Christ).

Manoogian had dreams of not only revitalizing Armenian Jerusalem, but also of expanding and reinforcing the Armenian presence here. One of his most ambitious plans was to construct a hostel for pilgrims on land owned by the Patriarchate, but it never got off the drawing board – city hall had other plans of its own.

Manoogian will be remembered as a caring shepherd and reformer. Under his tenure, the Patriarchate workforce almost quadrupled: there were more employees within the confines of the Convent of St James, seat of the Jerusalem Patriarchate, than there were people living there.

And he made sure that paychecks were disbursed on time, a welcome departure from past practices.

When Manoogian arrived on the scene, he discovered chaos. His unrelenting efforts to instill a sense of order and accountability into Patriarchal affairs, have proved successful, to a degree.

“Much still remains to be done,” as one clerical source confided.

A perennial diplomat, Manoogian meticulously maintained smooth relations with both sides of the political divide in the country. The aura of charisma that enveloped him and his standing in the Armenian world, could have very easily secured him the highest accolade the church could ever grant: Catholicos (supreme head) of All Armenians. But although he served as Locum Tenens following the death of Catholicos Vazken I, he felt he would never leave Jerusalem.

He was the son of a people that had endured and survived wars and cataclysms, but that had not learned to turn their heart into stone.

Manoogian will be buried on Oct 22, in the Armenian cemetery on Mount Zion, just outside the towering walls of the Old City, bare weeks after the Armenian church mourned another of its princes, Archbishop Aghan Baliozian, Primate of the Armenian Diocese of Australia and New Zealand.

Who will be the 97th Armenian Patriarch of Jerusalem?

No one will know, until election day. For now, as tradition demands, the residence of the 96th Patriarch has been sealed, guarding his secrets and his dreams.

His triumphs and tribulations remain public knowledge.

Source: HetqOriginial Article

No related posts.

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John Balian’s “Novel Approach” Brings the Armenian Saga to the Masses – An interview with John Balian by Lucine Kasbarian

Gray Wolves and White Doves cover art

13:04, October 13, 2012

From Arthur Hagopian

Jerusalem, Oct 12 – Clouds scud across the Jerusalem sky, carrying aloft with them the hopes and aspirations of the city’s tiny community of poets, artisans and dreamers, the Armenians.

As they pause in their daily labor to mourn the passing of their spiritual leader, Archbishop Torkom Manoogian, Armenian Patriarch of Jerusalem, many wonder what the future holds for them and for their church, the bastion of their national entity.

The death of the 93-year-old visionary who called himself, poetically, TAM or Shen-Mah, is bound to have a profound impact not only on the life and times of the Armenians of Jerusalem, but on the Armenian diaspora as well.

Armenians all over the world regard Jerusalem, the city of Christ, as their second holiest sanctuary after Etchmiadzin, although it wasn’t the quest for religious rejuvenation that first brought ancestors people to Jerusalem: they had arrived with the conquering armies of Tigranes II, a full century before the birth of Jesus of Nazareth.

They had stayed, settled and prospered, and bequeathed to this immortal city an invaluable legacy of ingeniousness, creativity and vitality. Jerusalem would never be what it is today without the variegated trove of Armenian contribution, among them the city’s first printing press and photographic studio.

When Manoogian ascended the throne of St James as the 96th Armenian Patriarch of Jerusalem, he reburnished and reinforced the indelible stamp Armenians have left on the city.

And following in the footsteps of illustrious predecessors like the legendary Baron Der and Gregory the Chainbearer, he set in motion a new era of glasnost and perestroika, qualities in dire need at the time.

Among his most memorable achievements are the computerization of the Patriarchate’s records, the overhaul of its filing, accounting and database systems and the renovation of dilapidated priestly quarters.

Caught up in the refreshing breezes his advent had launched, life in the moribund Armenian enclave, which occupies more than one sixth of the Old City, took on a new, invigorated meaning.

There was a feeling of almost tangible euphoria in the wake of his election, and there were many who wistfully wished he had come earlier to Jerusalem.

To keep the Armenian diaspora well informed about the Patriarchate and about Jerusalem, he set up a press office (and asked this correspondent to head it) which churned out a steady stream of articles, newsletters and press releases over the years.

Manoogian had come home. His destiny had driven him from the deserts of Mesopotamia to the golden domes of Jerusalem, on a journey of devotion and dedication, in the service of the Armenian church to which he gave his all.

A prolific writer, his most recent oeuvre was a translation of Shakespeare’s sonnets into Armenian.

But his favorite topic was what he called the “impossible love.”

“It’s the ability, nay, the gift, to be able to love your enemy, to forgive love those who hate you and would do you ill,” he explained to me.

A gifted musician, he became the acknowledge authority on the Armenian nations’ greatest musical genius, Gomidas.

I remember visiting him two years ago, when he was in the initial stages of Parkinson’s, and sitting silently for long minutes, waiting for him to speak. He had great difficulty finding the words until I broached the subject of his book on Gomidas.

The moment he heard the name, his face lit up and he launched into an impassioned discourse.

Manoogian was born on Feb 16, 1919 in a refugee camp near the sand-enshrouded Iraqi town of Baqoubah. As a child, he attended a school in Baghdad, the capital, that Armenians who had sought refuge from the Turkish massacres, had established.

Towards the end of his early schooling, tentative yearnings for something spiritually loftier became insistent, assailing his waking and sleeping hours, demanding satisfaction, and ultimately guiding him in the direction of Jerusalem.

He was ordained celibate priest in 1939 and remained in the city until 1946 when he traveled to the US, only to return a few years later.

Ten years were to pass before America called again. But this time he reached its shores as Primate of the Eastern Diocese of the Armenian church.

He was elected patriarch of Jerusalem on March 22, 1990.

Throughout his life, Manoogian garnered numerous honors and tributes, both from religious and lay institutions, among them the US Statue of Liberty Medal.

He was also chosen “Man of the Year” by “Religion in American Life.” He nurtured a keen interest in ecumenical affairs and has been instrumental in helping maintain the spirit of brotherly relations between the various religious institutions in Jerusalem. (In the US, he had also served on the Board of the National Council of Churches of Christ).

Manoogian had dreams of not only revitalizing Armenian Jerusalem, but also of expanding and reinforcing the Armenian presence here. One of his most ambitious plans was to construct a hostel for pilgrims on land owned by the Patriarchate, but it never got off the drawing board – city hall had other plans of its own.

Manoogian will be remembered as a caring shepherd and reformer. Under his tenure, the Patriarchate workforce almost quadrupled: there were more employees within the confines of the Convent of St James, seat of the Jerusalem Patriarchate, than there were people living there.

And he made sure that paychecks were disbursed on time, a welcome departure from past practices.

When Manoogian arrived on the scene, he discovered chaos. His unrelenting efforts to instill a sense of order and accountability into Patriarchal affairs, have proved successful, to a degree.

“Much still remains to be done,” as one clerical source confided.

A perennial diplomat, Manoogian meticulously maintained smooth relations with both sides of the political divide in the country. The aura of charisma that enveloped him and his standing in the Armenian world, could have very easily secured him the highest accolade the church could ever grant: Catholicos (supreme head) of All Armenians. But although he served as Locum Tenens following the death of Catholicos Vazken I, he felt he would never leave Jerusalem.

He was the son of a people that had endured and survived wars and cataclysms, but that had not learned to turn their heart into stone.

Manoogian will be buried on Oct 22, in the Armenian cemetery on Mount Zion, just outside the towering walls of the Old City, bare weeks after the Armenian church mourned another of its princes, Archbishop Aghan Baliozian, Primate of the Armenian Diocese of Australia and New Zealand.

Who will be the 97th Armenian Patriarch of Jerusalem?

No one will know, until election day. For now, as tradition demands, the residence of the 96th Patriarch has been sealed, guarding his secrets and his dreams.

His triumphs and tribulations remain public knowledge.

Source: HetqOriginial Article

No related posts.

New Children’s Picture Book From Armenian Folklore

13:04, October 13, 2012

From Arthur Hagopian

Jerusalem, Oct 12 – Clouds scud across the Jerusalem sky, carrying aloft with them the hopes and aspirations of the city’s tiny community of poets, artisans and dreamers, the Armenians.

As they pause in their daily labor to mourn the passing of their spiritual leader, Archbishop Torkom Manoogian, Armenian Patriarch of Jerusalem, many wonder what the future holds for them and for their church, the bastion of their national entity.

The death of the 93-year-old visionary who called himself, poetically, TAM or Shen-Mah, is bound to have a profound impact not only on the life and times of the Armenians of Jerusalem, but on the Armenian diaspora as well.

Armenians all over the world regard Jerusalem, the city of Christ, as their second holiest sanctuary after Etchmiadzin, although it wasn’t the quest for religious rejuvenation that first brought ancestors people to Jerusalem: they had arrived with the conquering armies of Tigranes II, a full century before the birth of Jesus of Nazareth.

They had stayed, settled and prospered, and bequeathed to this immortal city an invaluable legacy of ingeniousness, creativity and vitality. Jerusalem would never be what it is today without the variegated trove of Armenian contribution, among them the city’s first printing press and photographic studio.

When Manoogian ascended the throne of St James as the 96th Armenian Patriarch of Jerusalem, he reburnished and reinforced the indelible stamp Armenians have left on the city.

And following in the footsteps of illustrious predecessors like the legendary Baron Der and Gregory the Chainbearer, he set in motion a new era of glasnost and perestroika, qualities in dire need at the time.

Among his most memorable achievements are the computerization of the Patriarchate’s records, the overhaul of its filing, accounting and database systems and the renovation of dilapidated priestly quarters.

Caught up in the refreshing breezes his advent had launched, life in the moribund Armenian enclave, which occupies more than one sixth of the Old City, took on a new, invigorated meaning.

There was a feeling of almost tangible euphoria in the wake of his election, and there were many who wistfully wished he had come earlier to Jerusalem.

To keep the Armenian diaspora well informed about the Patriarchate and about Jerusalem, he set up a press office (and asked this correspondent to head it) which churned out a steady stream of articles, newsletters and press releases over the years.

Manoogian had come home. His destiny had driven him from the deserts of Mesopotamia to the golden domes of Jerusalem, on a journey of devotion and dedication, in the service of the Armenian church to which he gave his all.

A prolific writer, his most recent oeuvre was a translation of Shakespeare’s sonnets into Armenian.

But his favorite topic was what he called the “impossible love.”

“It’s the ability, nay, the gift, to be able to love your enemy, to forgive love those who hate you and would do you ill,” he explained to me.

A gifted musician, he became the acknowledge authority on the Armenian nations’ greatest musical genius, Gomidas.

I remember visiting him two years ago, when he was in the initial stages of Parkinson’s, and sitting silently for long minutes, waiting for him to speak. He had great difficulty finding the words until I broached the subject of his book on Gomidas.

The moment he heard the name, his face lit up and he launched into an impassioned discourse.

Manoogian was born on Feb 16, 1919 in a refugee camp near the sand-enshrouded Iraqi town of Baqoubah. As a child, he attended a school in Baghdad, the capital, that Armenians who had sought refuge from the Turkish massacres, had established.

Towards the end of his early schooling, tentative yearnings for something spiritually loftier became insistent, assailing his waking and sleeping hours, demanding satisfaction, and ultimately guiding him in the direction of Jerusalem.

He was ordained celibate priest in 1939 and remained in the city until 1946 when he traveled to the US, only to return a few years later.

Ten years were to pass before America called again. But this time he reached its shores as Primate of the Eastern Diocese of the Armenian church.

He was elected patriarch of Jerusalem on March 22, 1990.

Throughout his life, Manoogian garnered numerous honors and tributes, both from religious and lay institutions, among them the US Statue of Liberty Medal.

He was also chosen “Man of the Year” by “Religion in American Life.” He nurtured a keen interest in ecumenical affairs and has been instrumental in helping maintain the spirit of brotherly relations between the various religious institutions in Jerusalem. (In the US, he had also served on the Board of the National Council of Churches of Christ).

Manoogian had dreams of not only revitalizing Armenian Jerusalem, but also of expanding and reinforcing the Armenian presence here. One of his most ambitious plans was to construct a hostel for pilgrims on land owned by the Patriarchate, but it never got off the drawing board – city hall had other plans of its own.

Manoogian will be remembered as a caring shepherd and reformer. Under his tenure, the Patriarchate workforce almost quadrupled: there were more employees within the confines of the Convent of St James, seat of the Jerusalem Patriarchate, than there were people living there.

And he made sure that paychecks were disbursed on time, a welcome departure from past practices.

When Manoogian arrived on the scene, he discovered chaos. His unrelenting efforts to instill a sense of order and accountability into Patriarchal affairs, have proved successful, to a degree.

“Much still remains to be done,” as one clerical source confided.

A perennial diplomat, Manoogian meticulously maintained smooth relations with both sides of the political divide in the country. The aura of charisma that enveloped him and his standing in the Armenian world, could have very easily secured him the highest accolade the church could ever grant: Catholicos (supreme head) of All Armenians. But although he served as Locum Tenens following the death of Catholicos Vazken I, he felt he would never leave Jerusalem.

He was the son of a people that had endured and survived wars and cataclysms, but that had not learned to turn their heart into stone.

Manoogian will be buried on Oct 22, in the Armenian cemetery on Mount Zion, just outside the towering walls of the Old City, bare weeks after the Armenian church mourned another of its princes, Archbishop Aghan Baliozian, Primate of the Armenian Diocese of Australia and New Zealand.

Who will be the 97th Armenian Patriarch of Jerusalem?

No one will know, until election day. For now, as tradition demands, the residence of the 96th Patriarch has been sealed, guarding his secrets and his dreams.

His triumphs and tribulations remain public knowledge.

Source: HetqOriginial Article

No related posts.

“We Need To Lift The Armenian Taboo”

13:04, October 13, 2012

From Arthur Hagopian

Jerusalem, Oct 12 – Clouds scud across the Jerusalem sky, carrying aloft with them the hopes and aspirations of the city’s tiny community of poets, artisans and dreamers, the Armenians.

As they pause in their daily labor to mourn the passing of their spiritual leader, Archbishop Torkom Manoogian, Armenian Patriarch of Jerusalem, many wonder what the future holds for them and for their church, the bastion of their national entity.

The death of the 93-year-old visionary who called himself, poetically, TAM or Shen-Mah, is bound to have a profound impact not only on the life and times of the Armenians of Jerusalem, but on the Armenian diaspora as well.

Armenians all over the world regard Jerusalem, the city of Christ, as their second holiest sanctuary after Etchmiadzin, although it wasn’t the quest for religious rejuvenation that first brought ancestors people to Jerusalem: they had arrived with the conquering armies of Tigranes II, a full century before the birth of Jesus of Nazareth.

They had stayed, settled and prospered, and bequeathed to this immortal city an invaluable legacy of ingeniousness, creativity and vitality. Jerusalem would never be what it is today without the variegated trove of Armenian contribution, among them the city’s first printing press and photographic studio.

When Manoogian ascended the throne of St James as the 96th Armenian Patriarch of Jerusalem, he reburnished and reinforced the indelible stamp Armenians have left on the city.

And following in the footsteps of illustrious predecessors like the legendary Baron Der and Gregory the Chainbearer, he set in motion a new era of glasnost and perestroika, qualities in dire need at the time.

Among his most memorable achievements are the computerization of the Patriarchate’s records, the overhaul of its filing, accounting and database systems and the renovation of dilapidated priestly quarters.

Caught up in the refreshing breezes his advent had launched, life in the moribund Armenian enclave, which occupies more than one sixth of the Old City, took on a new, invigorated meaning.

There was a feeling of almost tangible euphoria in the wake of his election, and there were many who wistfully wished he had come earlier to Jerusalem.

To keep the Armenian diaspora well informed about the Patriarchate and about Jerusalem, he set up a press office (and asked this correspondent to head it) which churned out a steady stream of articles, newsletters and press releases over the years.

Manoogian had come home. His destiny had driven him from the deserts of Mesopotamia to the golden domes of Jerusalem, on a journey of devotion and dedication, in the service of the Armenian church to which he gave his all.

A prolific writer, his most recent oeuvre was a translation of Shakespeare’s sonnets into Armenian.

But his favorite topic was what he called the “impossible love.”

“It’s the ability, nay, the gift, to be able to love your enemy, to forgive love those who hate you and would do you ill,” he explained to me.

A gifted musician, he became the acknowledge authority on the Armenian nations’ greatest musical genius, Gomidas.

I remember visiting him two years ago, when he was in the initial stages of Parkinson’s, and sitting silently for long minutes, waiting for him to speak. He had great difficulty finding the words until I broached the subject of his book on Gomidas.

The moment he heard the name, his face lit up and he launched into an impassioned discourse.

Manoogian was born on Feb 16, 1919 in a refugee camp near the sand-enshrouded Iraqi town of Baqoubah. As a child, he attended a school in Baghdad, the capital, that Armenians who had sought refuge from the Turkish massacres, had established.

Towards the end of his early schooling, tentative yearnings for something spiritually loftier became insistent, assailing his waking and sleeping hours, demanding satisfaction, and ultimately guiding him in the direction of Jerusalem.

He was ordained celibate priest in 1939 and remained in the city until 1946 when he traveled to the US, only to return a few years later.

Ten years were to pass before America called again. But this time he reached its shores as Primate of the Eastern Diocese of the Armenian church.

He was elected patriarch of Jerusalem on March 22, 1990.

Throughout his life, Manoogian garnered numerous honors and tributes, both from religious and lay institutions, among them the US Statue of Liberty Medal.

He was also chosen “Man of the Year” by “Religion in American Life.” He nurtured a keen interest in ecumenical affairs and has been instrumental in helping maintain the spirit of brotherly relations between the various religious institutions in Jerusalem. (In the US, he had also served on the Board of the National Council of Churches of Christ).

Manoogian had dreams of not only revitalizing Armenian Jerusalem, but also of expanding and reinforcing the Armenian presence here. One of his most ambitious plans was to construct a hostel for pilgrims on land owned by the Patriarchate, but it never got off the drawing board – city hall had other plans of its own.

Manoogian will be remembered as a caring shepherd and reformer. Under his tenure, the Patriarchate workforce almost quadrupled: there were more employees within the confines of the Convent of St James, seat of the Jerusalem Patriarchate, than there were people living there.

And he made sure that paychecks were disbursed on time, a welcome departure from past practices.

When Manoogian arrived on the scene, he discovered chaos. His unrelenting efforts to instill a sense of order and accountability into Patriarchal affairs, have proved successful, to a degree.

“Much still remains to be done,” as one clerical source confided.

A perennial diplomat, Manoogian meticulously maintained smooth relations with both sides of the political divide in the country. The aura of charisma that enveloped him and his standing in the Armenian world, could have very easily secured him the highest accolade the church could ever grant: Catholicos (supreme head) of All Armenians. But although he served as Locum Tenens following the death of Catholicos Vazken I, he felt he would never leave Jerusalem.

He was the son of a people that had endured and survived wars and cataclysms, but that had not learned to turn their heart into stone.

Manoogian will be buried on Oct 22, in the Armenian cemetery on Mount Zion, just outside the towering walls of the Old City, bare weeks after the Armenian church mourned another of its princes, Archbishop Aghan Baliozian, Primate of the Armenian Diocese of Australia and New Zealand.

Who will be the 97th Armenian Patriarch of Jerusalem?

No one will know, until election day. For now, as tradition demands, the residence of the 96th Patriarch has been sealed, guarding his secrets and his dreams.

His triumphs and tribulations remain public knowledge.

Source: HetqOriginial Article

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US Media Discusses The Armenian Genocide

13:04, October 13, 2012

From Arthur Hagopian

Jerusalem, Oct 12 – Clouds scud across the Jerusalem sky, carrying aloft with them the hopes and aspirations of the city’s tiny community of poets, artisans and dreamers, the Armenians.

As they pause in their daily labor to mourn the passing of their spiritual leader, Archbishop Torkom Manoogian, Armenian Patriarch of Jerusalem, many wonder what the future holds for them and for their church, the bastion of their national entity.

The death of the 93-year-old visionary who called himself, poetically, TAM or Shen-Mah, is bound to have a profound impact not only on the life and times of the Armenians of Jerusalem, but on the Armenian diaspora as well.

Armenians all over the world regard Jerusalem, the city of Christ, as their second holiest sanctuary after Etchmiadzin, although it wasn’t the quest for religious rejuvenation that first brought ancestors people to Jerusalem: they had arrived with the conquering armies of Tigranes II, a full century before the birth of Jesus of Nazareth.

They had stayed, settled and prospered, and bequeathed to this immortal city an invaluable legacy of ingeniousness, creativity and vitality. Jerusalem would never be what it is today without the variegated trove of Armenian contribution, among them the city’s first printing press and photographic studio.

When Manoogian ascended the throne of St James as the 96th Armenian Patriarch of Jerusalem, he reburnished and reinforced the indelible stamp Armenians have left on the city.

And following in the footsteps of illustrious predecessors like the legendary Baron Der and Gregory the Chainbearer, he set in motion a new era of glasnost and perestroika, qualities in dire need at the time.

Among his most memorable achievements are the computerization of the Patriarchate’s records, the overhaul of its filing, accounting and database systems and the renovation of dilapidated priestly quarters.

Caught up in the refreshing breezes his advent had launched, life in the moribund Armenian enclave, which occupies more than one sixth of the Old City, took on a new, invigorated meaning.

There was a feeling of almost tangible euphoria in the wake of his election, and there were many who wistfully wished he had come earlier to Jerusalem.

To keep the Armenian diaspora well informed about the Patriarchate and about Jerusalem, he set up a press office (and asked this correspondent to head it) which churned out a steady stream of articles, newsletters and press releases over the years.

Manoogian had come home. His destiny had driven him from the deserts of Mesopotamia to the golden domes of Jerusalem, on a journey of devotion and dedication, in the service of the Armenian church to which he gave his all.

A prolific writer, his most recent oeuvre was a translation of Shakespeare’s sonnets into Armenian.

But his favorite topic was what he called the “impossible love.”

“It’s the ability, nay, the gift, to be able to love your enemy, to forgive love those who hate you and would do you ill,” he explained to me.

A gifted musician, he became the acknowledge authority on the Armenian nations’ greatest musical genius, Gomidas.

I remember visiting him two years ago, when he was in the initial stages of Parkinson’s, and sitting silently for long minutes, waiting for him to speak. He had great difficulty finding the words until I broached the subject of his book on Gomidas.

The moment he heard the name, his face lit up and he launched into an impassioned discourse.

Manoogian was born on Feb 16, 1919 in a refugee camp near the sand-enshrouded Iraqi town of Baqoubah. As a child, he attended a school in Baghdad, the capital, that Armenians who had sought refuge from the Turkish massacres, had established.

Towards the end of his early schooling, tentative yearnings for something spiritually loftier became insistent, assailing his waking and sleeping hours, demanding satisfaction, and ultimately guiding him in the direction of Jerusalem.

He was ordained celibate priest in 1939 and remained in the city until 1946 when he traveled to the US, only to return a few years later.

Ten years were to pass before America called again. But this time he reached its shores as Primate of the Eastern Diocese of the Armenian church.

He was elected patriarch of Jerusalem on March 22, 1990.

Throughout his life, Manoogian garnered numerous honors and tributes, both from religious and lay institutions, among them the US Statue of Liberty Medal.

He was also chosen “Man of the Year” by “Religion in American Life.” He nurtured a keen interest in ecumenical affairs and has been instrumental in helping maintain the spirit of brotherly relations between the various religious institutions in Jerusalem. (In the US, he had also served on the Board of the National Council of Churches of Christ).

Manoogian had dreams of not only revitalizing Armenian Jerusalem, but also of expanding and reinforcing the Armenian presence here. One of his most ambitious plans was to construct a hostel for pilgrims on land owned by the Patriarchate, but it never got off the drawing board – city hall had other plans of its own.

Manoogian will be remembered as a caring shepherd and reformer. Under his tenure, the Patriarchate workforce almost quadrupled: there were more employees within the confines of the Convent of St James, seat of the Jerusalem Patriarchate, than there were people living there.

And he made sure that paychecks were disbursed on time, a welcome departure from past practices.

When Manoogian arrived on the scene, he discovered chaos. His unrelenting efforts to instill a sense of order and accountability into Patriarchal affairs, have proved successful, to a degree.

“Much still remains to be done,” as one clerical source confided.

A perennial diplomat, Manoogian meticulously maintained smooth relations with both sides of the political divide in the country. The aura of charisma that enveloped him and his standing in the Armenian world, could have very easily secured him the highest accolade the church could ever grant: Catholicos (supreme head) of All Armenians. But although he served as Locum Tenens following the death of Catholicos Vazken I, he felt he would never leave Jerusalem.

He was the son of a people that had endured and survived wars and cataclysms, but that had not learned to turn their heart into stone.

Manoogian will be buried on Oct 22, in the Armenian cemetery on Mount Zion, just outside the towering walls of the Old City, bare weeks after the Armenian church mourned another of its princes, Archbishop Aghan Baliozian, Primate of the Armenian Diocese of Australia and New Zealand.

Who will be the 97th Armenian Patriarch of Jerusalem?

No one will know, until election day. For now, as tradition demands, the residence of the 96th Patriarch has been sealed, guarding his secrets and his dreams.

His triumphs and tribulations remain public knowledge.

Source: HetqOriginial Article

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Source: HetqOriginial Article

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For Better or For Worse: Nature Protection Ministry Proposes Amendments to Water Use Laws

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16:44, February 14, 2014

With the goal of providing a systematic solution to issues of effective use of water resources in Ararat valley, the Ministry of Nature Protection of the Republic of Armenia (RA) is proposing amendments and additions to the RA Water Code, and the RA laws on the Republic of Armenia’s National Water Program, on Licensing, and on State Tax.

The proposed legislative package has been sent to the relevant state agencies for their input.

Head of the Ministry of Nature Protection’s Water Resources Management Agency Volodya Narimanyan told Hetq, said that with this amendment package his ministry is attempting to clarify the ideas and the ambiguous commentary, as well as introduce new requirements. For example, one of the main points of the proposed amendments is if water use permit conditions are not met, the water use permit might be annulled.

“In the past, if water use conditions weren’t met, we couldn’t void the permit, but now we’re making that clear. If the state gives you a water use permit with this condition, be kind and meet this condition; otherwise, we will make the permit null and void,” he explained.

A new requirement in the proposed package concerning the execution of drilling operations stipulates that a drilling company or individual must obtain a license so that the state can supervise its activities. “Those companies that execute drilling must have a license for drilling. That is, we are proposing to license activities,” he added.

After the relevant state bodies discuss and submit their opinions regarding the amendments, Narimanyan says, the package will be sent to the RA Ministry of Justice, the government, then finally to parliament.

Source: HetqOriginial Article

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2013 in Civil Society: Protests and more protests

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The struggle of civil movements this year has been comprehensive and diverse with limited success in certain fields due to unified efforts and active involvement of the civil society.

Despite the rather passive start of the year in terms of civil movements, the second half of 2013 turned out to be tense with active developments.

Some analysts believe that especially after the February 18 presidential ballot, when current president Serzh Sargsyan won a decisive victory over his opponents and was re-elected for a second term, despite the widespread poverty and atmosphere of injustice in the country, people became even more aware of the fact that is it impossible to achieve changes via elections and started practicing their constitutional rights to civil protest and disobedience more frequently.

Karabakh war veterans’ civil standoff has been unprecedented. Although, every now and then on different occasions they had complained of their social conditions and of being neglected by the state , however never before had they come out to hold systematic rallies and sitting strikes. Retired army colonel Volodya Avetisyan initiated the civil standoff in May and in October found himself behind the bars, with charges of “swindling …in large amounts”. Avetisyan’s and his comrades-in-arms claim that by bringing charges the authorities are trying to silence him. The war vets demanding increase of their pensions and various privileges have now focused their struggle on various acts of protest in Avetisyan’s support. There is another group of Karabakh war veterans presenting political demands to the government. Every Thursday they hold small rallies in Liberty Square and demand that the government resign.

Yerevan mayor Taron Margaryan’s decision to raise public bus fare by 50 percent made the hot Yerevan summer even hotter.

The decision was immediately followed by a civil movement when numerous young activists held a variety of acts of protest during five consecutive days relentlessly struggling, rebelling against the bus fare increase and made the municipal government in the Armenian capital heed the people’s voice, forcing them to understand they would not pay more for using the overloaded, worn-out and hardly functioning minibuses.

The unified effort yielded results and on July 26 the mayor suspended the application of his decision temporarily, meaning that the buses and minibuses continued operating for the same 100 dram fare (around 24 cents). The mayor, however, stated that if residents of Yerevan wanted to have decent public transport services, they have to be ready to pay more. Municipal officials and transport companies running the routes have repeatedly stated after the summer civil standoff that the rise of bus fare is unavoidable, grounding it by the fact that everything else has become more expensive except for public transport services, hence their expenses have grown and they are operating at a loss.

The departing year has turned out to be rather active also in terms of public protests against controversial construction projects. In August, residents of 10 and 12 Sayat-Nova Avenue and 5 Komitas streets, in Yerevan, rebelled against construction in their neighborhoods. These people claim that the construction licenses in densely populated zones of the city are illegal, violate the seismic resistance norms, and block their light. Despite the variety of measures the residents have resorted to, even lying down in front of construction machines to block their way, no tangible results have been achieved; their struggle is ongoing (h).

Despite a drawn-out battle to preserve unchanged Yerevan’s Pak Shuka (“Covered Market”), on the list of historical-cultural heritage and belonging to businessman MP Samvel Alexanyan, opened its doors after two years of repairs, but now as a fashionable supermarket, rather than the produce market it used to be. Although ruling Republican MP Alexanyan kept the fa

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Armenian Foreign Policies 2013: Customs Union, U-turn on EU accord, Karabakh, Turkey, regional developments

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2013 became a milestone year for Armenia not only in its foreign, but also domestic politics. After nearly four years of negotiations with the European Union over the signing of an association agreement on September 3 Armenia unexpectedly announced its intention to join the Customs Union of Russia, Belarus and Kazakhstan.

This decision has had its influence not only on Armenia proper, but also on the processes elsewhere in Eastern Europe. Inspired by Armenia’s decision, Russia stepped up its pressure on Ukraine, which suspended the process of signing of the Association Agreement with the EU one week before the Vilnius summit of Eastern Partnership. As a result, on November 29 such agreements were initialed only by Moldova and Georgia.

During the year there has been an ongoing debate in Armenia and other post-Soviet countries about whether it is expedient “to revive a new Soviet empire” under the name of a Eurasian Union. But at the end of the year plans to create such a union remain relevant – in May 2014 Armenia is going to be one of the six founders of the Eurasian Union (along with Russia, Kazakhstan, Belarus, Tajikistan and Kyrgyzstan).

Before September 3, Armenia was actively engaged with Europe, stating about shared values and ‘civilizational’ approaches. Armenia even dared reproach Russia for selling offensive weapons to Azerbaijan.

After September 3, however, Armenia suddenly remembered its centuries-old friendship with Russia as well as Russia’s ‘salutary’ role. Pro-Russian rhetoric increased and some even stated the readiness to return to the Russian Empire. In particular, publicist Zori Balayan wrote a letter to Russian President Vladimir Putin, mentioning the Treaty of Gulistan of 1813, according to which, as a result of the Russian-Persian war, Persia renounced claims to Karabakh that went under Russia’s control.

The Russia-West struggle for post-Soviet countries, including for Armenia, in 2013 came out of its passive phase and acquired the character of an open confrontation. In the course of this battle all methods were employed – from economic blackmail to high-level visits. In particular, the visit by Putin to Armenia on December 2, as some analysts say, marked Armenia’s losing another portion of its sovereignty and security to Russia.

There have been some new developments in the Karabakh settlement process as well. In particular, on November 19, in Vienna, the presidents of Armenia and Azerbaijan, Serzh Sargsyan and Ilham Aliyev, met for the first time in almost two years. During the meeting some new proposals were apparently discussed. The talks were confidential, but on the basis of available information experts assume that Russia and Turkey are promoting the project of opening the Turkish-Armenian border at the expense of Armenia’s concessions on two districts around Karabakh. The U.S. and Europe appear to insist on settlement and opening of communications while maintaining the current status quo in Karabakh.

Partially this version was confirmed on the eve of Turkish Foreign Minister Ahmet Davutoglu’s visit to Yerevan on December 12 (he was attending a regional organization’s forum in the Armenian capital). The Turkish press openly reported the offer from Turkey, but President Sargsyan did not receive Davutoglu, while Minister Edward Nalbandian stated that preconditions are unacceptable in Armenian-Turkish normalization.

The sudden change in the policy of Armenia, according to analysts, could lead to some adjustments in the positions of Armenia on relations with Turkey. At the beginning of 2013 Yerevan set up a commission to study possible legal claims to Turkey. The body was headed by the then Prosecutor-General Aghvan Hovsepyan. It was followed by assumptions that in 2015, when the 100th anniversary of the Armenian Genocide will be marked, Armenia, with the support of the West, intends to advance serious claims to Turkey. However, the commission has not yet taken any public steps, and after September 3 decisions on claims to Turkey may already be made through Moscow.

Turkey has made no secret of its concern, especially in connection with the probability of combined Kurdish and Armenian claims. In this regard, Turkey has launched a wide-ranging process of reconciliation with the Kurds. 2013 became auspicious also for the Kurdish movement as the prospect of establishing Kurdistan became even closer.

The agreement on the conflict in Syria became an important event of the year also for Armenia in view of the sizable ethnic Armenian community in this Middle Eastern country. In accordance with this agreement, the world power centers decided not to support any side in the Syrian conflict, to destroy Syria’s chemical weapons and lead the country to democratic elections in 2014.

An even more significant agreement was reached by the end of the year on Iran’s nuclear program, which immediately led to the lifting of a number of sanctions that had been imposed on the Islamic Republic by the West and its activation in regional politics. In particular, Iran immediately tried to offer natural gas to Armenia that would apparently be less expensive than Russia’s. Projects in energy and communication sectors have also become more relevant in view of the recent developments and Armenia may play an important role in them.

Source: Armenia NowOriginial Article

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Heritage reshuffle: Postanjyan becomes new leader of parliamentary faction

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Zaruhi Postanjyan has been elected new head of the opposition Heritage faction in parliament. The change comes after Ruben Hakobyan announced his decision to resign as faction leader earlier today.

Talking to media in parliament Hakobyan said Heritage Party leader Raffi Hovannisian had been notified about his move well in advance. He left questions about reasons for his step without commentary, only saying that he had decided to step down as faction leader before the recent scandal around Postanjyan in the wake of her controversial question to President Serzh Sargsyan about his gambling habit at the PACE plenary session in Strasbourg on October 2.

Unlike a majority of Heritage members Hakobyan then was critical of Postanjyan’s behavior. Representatives of the ruling party in Armenia called her statement in Strasbourg slanderous and the parliament speaker threatened to expel her from the Armenian delegation to the PACE.

Postanjian, meanwhile, would not be drawn into speculation about the reasons for Hakobyan’s decision either.

Source: Armenia NowOriginial Article

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