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Post Election Planning: RPA session reveals no hint in future Government makeup

May 18, 2012 Armenia, Business, Top News No Comments
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The executive board of the Republican party of Armenia, that now has the majority of mandates in the parliament, held a session late on Thursday, but concluded without answers to the main political intrigue of late: Will there be coalition and what will the new government structure look like?

After the session was over President and RPA leader Serzh Sargsyan, when saying goodbye to his fellow party members, told the press that there isn’t a final decision on collation yet and that they will announce it as soon as there is one.

During the briefing that followed the session, vice-chairman of the National Assembly, RPA speaker Eduard Sharmazanov told reporters that this was the first post-election meeting of the executive body, hence they had discussed the post-election developments. During the session Sargsyan talked about the meetings he had had with leaders of other parties and said that the RPA political counseling is in process.

“Whatever the decision it will be based on our state interests,” said Sharmazanov, adding that they will talk more concretely about the coalition after the next session scheduled for May 24.

Meanwhile, prior to Thursday’s session, it became known that the president had a meeting with leader of Prosperous Armenia Party (PAP, which came second in the May 6 elections) Gagik Tsarukyan. PAP appears divided among itself by those who support the idea of coalition with RPA and those who are categorically against it. Among those opposed, is former foreign minister Vardan Oskanian, number two on PAP’s proportionate list. Oskanian went as far as saying he might leave the party he had joined shortly before the elections, should it form a collation with RPA again. Another well-known PAP representative Naira Zohrabyan, who had earlier spoken against it, made an ambiguous statement on Wednesday, saying that forming a coalition is “not an end in itself” to PAP.

“Having a few ministers more, a few ministers less doesn’t make a difference to PAP. Our task is more global – forming the kind of government, be it coalitional or not, that would immediately take up the solution of most serious challenges our country is faced with, improvement of people’s living standards, changing the business and economic environment in the country,” she said in her statement.

Sharmazanov said during the briefing that they had not talked about any posts and appointments.

“We did not discuss change of prime minister or ministers, neither did we talk about the parliament speaker’s position. No name-and-surname discussion took place, not any related to my position either,” he said.

“We discussed the proportionate representation MPs, but even that hasn’t been finalized yet. We will have the final picture when it is decided who goes to the cabinet, who leaves the government and goes to the parliament, or who will enter the legislative and who the executive body,” Sharmazanyan summed up.

Source: Armenia NowOriginial Article

Related posts:

  1. Coalition Speculation: Why does RPA need one?
  2. Alone at the Top: RPA to run government without other party help
  3. RPA Executive Body’s meeting over in Armenia’s capital
  4. Who’s Next PM?: RPA and PAP wrestle through cabinet selection and possible coalition
  5. Vote 2013: PAP refusal to form coalition signals approaching presidential election

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John Balian’s “Novel Approach” Brings the Armenian Saga to the Masses – An interview with John Balian by Lucine Kasbarian

Gray Wolves and White Doves cover art

The executive board of the Republican party of Armenia, that now has the majority of mandates in the parliament, held a session late on Thursday, but concluded without answers to the main political intrigue of late: Will there be coalition and what will the new government structure look like?

After the session was over President and RPA leader Serzh Sargsyan, when saying goodbye to his fellow party members, told the press that there isn’t a final decision on collation yet and that they will announce it as soon as there is one.

During the briefing that followed the session, vice-chairman of the National Assembly, RPA speaker Eduard Sharmazanov told reporters that this was the first post-election meeting of the executive body, hence they had discussed the post-election developments. During the session Sargsyan talked about the meetings he had had with leaders of other parties and said that the RPA political counseling is in process.

“Whatever the decision it will be based on our state interests,” said Sharmazanov, adding that they will talk more concretely about the coalition after the next session scheduled for May 24.

Meanwhile, prior to Thursday’s session, it became known that the president had a meeting with leader of Prosperous Armenia Party (PAP, which came second in the May 6 elections) Gagik Tsarukyan. PAP appears divided among itself by those who support the idea of coalition with RPA and those who are categorically against it. Among those opposed, is former foreign minister Vardan Oskanian, number two on PAP’s proportionate list. Oskanian went as far as saying he might leave the party he had joined shortly before the elections, should it form a collation with RPA again. Another well-known PAP representative Naira Zohrabyan, who had earlier spoken against it, made an ambiguous statement on Wednesday, saying that forming a coalition is “not an end in itself” to PAP.

“Having a few ministers more, a few ministers less doesn’t make a difference to PAP. Our task is more global – forming the kind of government, be it coalitional or not, that would immediately take up the solution of most serious challenges our country is faced with, improvement of people’s living standards, changing the business and economic environment in the country,” she said in her statement.

Sharmazanov said during the briefing that they had not talked about any posts and appointments.

“We did not discuss change of prime minister or ministers, neither did we talk about the parliament speaker’s position. No name-and-surname discussion took place, not any related to my position either,” he said.

“We discussed the proportionate representation MPs, but even that hasn’t been finalized yet. We will have the final picture when it is decided who goes to the cabinet, who leaves the government and goes to the parliament, or who will enter the legislative and who the executive body,” Sharmazanyan summed up.

Source: Armenia NowOriginial Article

Related posts:

  1. Coalition Speculation: Why does RPA need one?
  2. Alone at the Top: RPA to run government without other party help
  3. RPA Executive Body’s meeting over in Armenia’s capital
  4. Who’s Next PM?: RPA and PAP wrestle through cabinet selection and possible coalition
  5. Vote 2013: PAP refusal to form coalition signals approaching presidential election

New Children’s Picture Book From Armenian Folklore

The executive board of the Republican party of Armenia, that now has the majority of mandates in the parliament, held a session late on Thursday, but concluded without answers to the main political intrigue of late: Will there be coalition and what will the new government structure look like?

After the session was over President and RPA leader Serzh Sargsyan, when saying goodbye to his fellow party members, told the press that there isn’t a final decision on collation yet and that they will announce it as soon as there is one.

During the briefing that followed the session, vice-chairman of the National Assembly, RPA speaker Eduard Sharmazanov told reporters that this was the first post-election meeting of the executive body, hence they had discussed the post-election developments. During the session Sargsyan talked about the meetings he had had with leaders of other parties and said that the RPA political counseling is in process.

“Whatever the decision it will be based on our state interests,” said Sharmazanov, adding that they will talk more concretely about the coalition after the next session scheduled for May 24.

Meanwhile, prior to Thursday’s session, it became known that the president had a meeting with leader of Prosperous Armenia Party (PAP, which came second in the May 6 elections) Gagik Tsarukyan. PAP appears divided among itself by those who support the idea of coalition with RPA and those who are categorically against it. Among those opposed, is former foreign minister Vardan Oskanian, number two on PAP’s proportionate list. Oskanian went as far as saying he might leave the party he had joined shortly before the elections, should it form a collation with RPA again. Another well-known PAP representative Naira Zohrabyan, who had earlier spoken against it, made an ambiguous statement on Wednesday, saying that forming a coalition is “not an end in itself” to PAP.

“Having a few ministers more, a few ministers less doesn’t make a difference to PAP. Our task is more global – forming the kind of government, be it coalitional or not, that would immediately take up the solution of most serious challenges our country is faced with, improvement of people’s living standards, changing the business and economic environment in the country,” she said in her statement.

Sharmazanov said during the briefing that they had not talked about any posts and appointments.

“We did not discuss change of prime minister or ministers, neither did we talk about the parliament speaker’s position. No name-and-surname discussion took place, not any related to my position either,” he said.

“We discussed the proportionate representation MPs, but even that hasn’t been finalized yet. We will have the final picture when it is decided who goes to the cabinet, who leaves the government and goes to the parliament, or who will enter the legislative and who the executive body,” Sharmazanyan summed up.

Source: Armenia NowOriginial Article

Related posts:

  1. Coalition Speculation: Why does RPA need one?
  2. Alone at the Top: RPA to run government without other party help
  3. RPA Executive Body’s meeting over in Armenia’s capital
  4. Who’s Next PM?: RPA and PAP wrestle through cabinet selection and possible coalition
  5. Vote 2013: PAP refusal to form coalition signals approaching presidential election

“We Need To Lift The Armenian Taboo”

The executive board of the Republican party of Armenia, that now has the majority of mandates in the parliament, held a session late on Thursday, but concluded without answers to the main political intrigue of late: Will there be coalition and what will the new government structure look like?

After the session was over President and RPA leader Serzh Sargsyan, when saying goodbye to his fellow party members, told the press that there isn’t a final decision on collation yet and that they will announce it as soon as there is one.

During the briefing that followed the session, vice-chairman of the National Assembly, RPA speaker Eduard Sharmazanov told reporters that this was the first post-election meeting of the executive body, hence they had discussed the post-election developments. During the session Sargsyan talked about the meetings he had had with leaders of other parties and said that the RPA political counseling is in process.

“Whatever the decision it will be based on our state interests,” said Sharmazanov, adding that they will talk more concretely about the coalition after the next session scheduled for May 24.

Meanwhile, prior to Thursday’s session, it became known that the president had a meeting with leader of Prosperous Armenia Party (PAP, which came second in the May 6 elections) Gagik Tsarukyan. PAP appears divided among itself by those who support the idea of coalition with RPA and those who are categorically against it. Among those opposed, is former foreign minister Vardan Oskanian, number two on PAP’s proportionate list. Oskanian went as far as saying he might leave the party he had joined shortly before the elections, should it form a collation with RPA again. Another well-known PAP representative Naira Zohrabyan, who had earlier spoken against it, made an ambiguous statement on Wednesday, saying that forming a coalition is “not an end in itself” to PAP.

“Having a few ministers more, a few ministers less doesn’t make a difference to PAP. Our task is more global – forming the kind of government, be it coalitional or not, that would immediately take up the solution of most serious challenges our country is faced with, improvement of people’s living standards, changing the business and economic environment in the country,” she said in her statement.

Sharmazanov said during the briefing that they had not talked about any posts and appointments.

“We did not discuss change of prime minister or ministers, neither did we talk about the parliament speaker’s position. No name-and-surname discussion took place, not any related to my position either,” he said.

“We discussed the proportionate representation MPs, but even that hasn’t been finalized yet. We will have the final picture when it is decided who goes to the cabinet, who leaves the government and goes to the parliament, or who will enter the legislative and who the executive body,” Sharmazanyan summed up.

Source: Armenia NowOriginial Article

Related posts:

  1. Coalition Speculation: Why does RPA need one?
  2. Alone at the Top: RPA to run government without other party help
  3. RPA Executive Body’s meeting over in Armenia’s capital
  4. Who’s Next PM?: RPA and PAP wrestle through cabinet selection and possible coalition
  5. Vote 2013: PAP refusal to form coalition signals approaching presidential election

US Media Discusses The Armenian Genocide

The executive board of the Republican party of Armenia, that now has the majority of mandates in the parliament, held a session late on Thursday, but concluded without answers to the main political intrigue of late: Will there be coalition and what will the new government structure look like?

After the session was over President and RPA leader Serzh Sargsyan, when saying goodbye to his fellow party members, told the press that there isn’t a final decision on collation yet and that they will announce it as soon as there is one.

During the briefing that followed the session, vice-chairman of the National Assembly, RPA speaker Eduard Sharmazanov told reporters that this was the first post-election meeting of the executive body, hence they had discussed the post-election developments. During the session Sargsyan talked about the meetings he had had with leaders of other parties and said that the RPA political counseling is in process.

“Whatever the decision it will be based on our state interests,” said Sharmazanov, adding that they will talk more concretely about the coalition after the next session scheduled for May 24.

Meanwhile, prior to Thursday’s session, it became known that the president had a meeting with leader of Prosperous Armenia Party (PAP, which came second in the May 6 elections) Gagik Tsarukyan. PAP appears divided among itself by those who support the idea of coalition with RPA and those who are categorically against it. Among those opposed, is former foreign minister Vardan Oskanian, number two on PAP’s proportionate list. Oskanian went as far as saying he might leave the party he had joined shortly before the elections, should it form a collation with RPA again. Another well-known PAP representative Naira Zohrabyan, who had earlier spoken against it, made an ambiguous statement on Wednesday, saying that forming a coalition is “not an end in itself” to PAP.

“Having a few ministers more, a few ministers less doesn’t make a difference to PAP. Our task is more global – forming the kind of government, be it coalitional or not, that would immediately take up the solution of most serious challenges our country is faced with, improvement of people’s living standards, changing the business and economic environment in the country,” she said in her statement.

Sharmazanov said during the briefing that they had not talked about any posts and appointments.

“We did not discuss change of prime minister or ministers, neither did we talk about the parliament speaker’s position. No name-and-surname discussion took place, not any related to my position either,” he said.

“We discussed the proportionate representation MPs, but even that hasn’t been finalized yet. We will have the final picture when it is decided who goes to the cabinet, who leaves the government and goes to the parliament, or who will enter the legislative and who the executive body,” Sharmazanyan summed up.

Source: Armenia NowOriginial Article

Related posts:

  1. Coalition Speculation: Why does RPA need one?
  2. Alone at the Top: RPA to run government without other party help
  3. RPA Executive Body’s meeting over in Armenia’s capital
  4. Who’s Next PM?: RPA and PAP wrestle through cabinet selection and possible coalition
  5. Vote 2013: PAP refusal to form coalition signals approaching presidential election

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For Better or For Worse: Nature Protection Ministry Proposes Amendments to Water Use Laws

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16:44, February 14, 2014

With the goal of providing a systematic solution to issues of effective use of water resources in Ararat valley, the Ministry of Nature Protection of the Republic of Armenia (RA) is proposing amendments and additions to the RA Water Code, and the RA laws on the Republic of Armenia’s National Water Program, on Licensing, and on State Tax.

The proposed legislative package has been sent to the relevant state agencies for their input.

Head of the Ministry of Nature Protection’s Water Resources Management Agency Volodya Narimanyan told Hetq, said that with this amendment package his ministry is attempting to clarify the ideas and the ambiguous commentary, as well as introduce new requirements. For example, one of the main points of the proposed amendments is if water use permit conditions are not met, the water use permit might be annulled.

“In the past, if water use conditions weren’t met, we couldn’t void the permit, but now we’re making that clear. If the state gives you a water use permit with this condition, be kind and meet this condition; otherwise, we will make the permit null and void,” he explained.

A new requirement in the proposed package concerning the execution of drilling operations stipulates that a drilling company or individual must obtain a license so that the state can supervise its activities. “Those companies that execute drilling must have a license for drilling. That is, we are proposing to license activities,” he added.

After the relevant state bodies discuss and submit their opinions regarding the amendments, Narimanyan says, the package will be sent to the RA Ministry of Justice, the government, then finally to parliament.

Source: HetqOriginial Article

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2013 in Civil Society: Protests and more protests

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The struggle of civil movements this year has been comprehensive and diverse with limited success in certain fields due to unified efforts and active involvement of the civil society.

Despite the rather passive start of the year in terms of civil movements, the second half of 2013 turned out to be tense with active developments.

Some analysts believe that especially after the February 18 presidential ballot, when current president Serzh Sargsyan won a decisive victory over his opponents and was re-elected for a second term, despite the widespread poverty and atmosphere of injustice in the country, people became even more aware of the fact that is it impossible to achieve changes via elections and started practicing their constitutional rights to civil protest and disobedience more frequently.

Karabakh war veterans’ civil standoff has been unprecedented. Although, every now and then on different occasions they had complained of their social conditions and of being neglected by the state , however never before had they come out to hold systematic rallies and sitting strikes. Retired army colonel Volodya Avetisyan initiated the civil standoff in May and in October found himself behind the bars, with charges of “swindling …in large amounts”. Avetisyan’s and his comrades-in-arms claim that by bringing charges the authorities are trying to silence him. The war vets demanding increase of their pensions and various privileges have now focused their struggle on various acts of protest in Avetisyan’s support. There is another group of Karabakh war veterans presenting political demands to the government. Every Thursday they hold small rallies in Liberty Square and demand that the government resign.

Yerevan mayor Taron Margaryan’s decision to raise public bus fare by 50 percent made the hot Yerevan summer even hotter.

The decision was immediately followed by a civil movement when numerous young activists held a variety of acts of protest during five consecutive days relentlessly struggling, rebelling against the bus fare increase and made the municipal government in the Armenian capital heed the people’s voice, forcing them to understand they would not pay more for using the overloaded, worn-out and hardly functioning minibuses.

The unified effort yielded results and on July 26 the mayor suspended the application of his decision temporarily, meaning that the buses and minibuses continued operating for the same 100 dram fare (around 24 cents). The mayor, however, stated that if residents of Yerevan wanted to have decent public transport services, they have to be ready to pay more. Municipal officials and transport companies running the routes have repeatedly stated after the summer civil standoff that the rise of bus fare is unavoidable, grounding it by the fact that everything else has become more expensive except for public transport services, hence their expenses have grown and they are operating at a loss.

The departing year has turned out to be rather active also in terms of public protests against controversial construction projects. In August, residents of 10 and 12 Sayat-Nova Avenue and 5 Komitas streets, in Yerevan, rebelled against construction in their neighborhoods. These people claim that the construction licenses in densely populated zones of the city are illegal, violate the seismic resistance norms, and block their light. Despite the variety of measures the residents have resorted to, even lying down in front of construction machines to block their way, no tangible results have been achieved; their struggle is ongoing (h).

Despite a drawn-out battle to preserve unchanged Yerevan’s Pak Shuka (“Covered Market”), on the list of historical-cultural heritage and belonging to businessman MP Samvel Alexanyan, opened its doors after two years of repairs, but now as a fashionable supermarket, rather than the produce market it used to be. Although ruling Republican MP Alexanyan kept the fa

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Armenian Foreign Policies 2013: Customs Union, U-turn on EU accord, Karabakh, Turkey, regional developments

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2013 became a milestone year for Armenia not only in its foreign, but also domestic politics. After nearly four years of negotiations with the European Union over the signing of an association agreement on September 3 Armenia unexpectedly announced its intention to join the Customs Union of Russia, Belarus and Kazakhstan.

This decision has had its influence not only on Armenia proper, but also on the processes elsewhere in Eastern Europe. Inspired by Armenia’s decision, Russia stepped up its pressure on Ukraine, which suspended the process of signing of the Association Agreement with the EU one week before the Vilnius summit of Eastern Partnership. As a result, on November 29 such agreements were initialed only by Moldova and Georgia.

During the year there has been an ongoing debate in Armenia and other post-Soviet countries about whether it is expedient “to revive a new Soviet empire” under the name of a Eurasian Union. But at the end of the year plans to create such a union remain relevant – in May 2014 Armenia is going to be one of the six founders of the Eurasian Union (along with Russia, Kazakhstan, Belarus, Tajikistan and Kyrgyzstan).

Before September 3, Armenia was actively engaged with Europe, stating about shared values and ‘civilizational’ approaches. Armenia even dared reproach Russia for selling offensive weapons to Azerbaijan.

After September 3, however, Armenia suddenly remembered its centuries-old friendship with Russia as well as Russia’s ‘salutary’ role. Pro-Russian rhetoric increased and some even stated the readiness to return to the Russian Empire. In particular, publicist Zori Balayan wrote a letter to Russian President Vladimir Putin, mentioning the Treaty of Gulistan of 1813, according to which, as a result of the Russian-Persian war, Persia renounced claims to Karabakh that went under Russia’s control.

The Russia-West struggle for post-Soviet countries, including for Armenia, in 2013 came out of its passive phase and acquired the character of an open confrontation. In the course of this battle all methods were employed – from economic blackmail to high-level visits. In particular, the visit by Putin to Armenia on December 2, as some analysts say, marked Armenia’s losing another portion of its sovereignty and security to Russia.

There have been some new developments in the Karabakh settlement process as well. In particular, on November 19, in Vienna, the presidents of Armenia and Azerbaijan, Serzh Sargsyan and Ilham Aliyev, met for the first time in almost two years. During the meeting some new proposals were apparently discussed. The talks were confidential, but on the basis of available information experts assume that Russia and Turkey are promoting the project of opening the Turkish-Armenian border at the expense of Armenia’s concessions on two districts around Karabakh. The U.S. and Europe appear to insist on settlement and opening of communications while maintaining the current status quo in Karabakh.

Partially this version was confirmed on the eve of Turkish Foreign Minister Ahmet Davutoglu’s visit to Yerevan on December 12 (he was attending a regional organization’s forum in the Armenian capital). The Turkish press openly reported the offer from Turkey, but President Sargsyan did not receive Davutoglu, while Minister Edward Nalbandian stated that preconditions are unacceptable in Armenian-Turkish normalization.

The sudden change in the policy of Armenia, according to analysts, could lead to some adjustments in the positions of Armenia on relations with Turkey. At the beginning of 2013 Yerevan set up a commission to study possible legal claims to Turkey. The body was headed by the then Prosecutor-General Aghvan Hovsepyan. It was followed by assumptions that in 2015, when the 100th anniversary of the Armenian Genocide will be marked, Armenia, with the support of the West, intends to advance serious claims to Turkey. However, the commission has not yet taken any public steps, and after September 3 decisions on claims to Turkey may already be made through Moscow.

Turkey has made no secret of its concern, especially in connection with the probability of combined Kurdish and Armenian claims. In this regard, Turkey has launched a wide-ranging process of reconciliation with the Kurds. 2013 became auspicious also for the Kurdish movement as the prospect of establishing Kurdistan became even closer.

The agreement on the conflict in Syria became an important event of the year also for Armenia in view of the sizable ethnic Armenian community in this Middle Eastern country. In accordance with this agreement, the world power centers decided not to support any side in the Syrian conflict, to destroy Syria’s chemical weapons and lead the country to democratic elections in 2014.

An even more significant agreement was reached by the end of the year on Iran’s nuclear program, which immediately led to the lifting of a number of sanctions that had been imposed on the Islamic Republic by the West and its activation in regional politics. In particular, Iran immediately tried to offer natural gas to Armenia that would apparently be less expensive than Russia’s. Projects in energy and communication sectors have also become more relevant in view of the recent developments and Armenia may play an important role in them.

Source: Armenia NowOriginial Article

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  2. Hraparak: Russian envoy drops hints about Karabakh status in Customs Union
  3. U-Turn: Official Yerevan’s ‘desire’ to join Russia-led Customs Union comes as ‘big surprise’ for many in Armenia
  4. Armenian Government approves plan of action to join Customs Union
  5. Vote 2013: Customs Union as a factor in Armenia elections

Heritage reshuffle: Postanjyan becomes new leader of parliamentary faction

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Zaruhi Postanjyan has been elected new head of the opposition Heritage faction in parliament. The change comes after Ruben Hakobyan announced his decision to resign as faction leader earlier today.

Talking to media in parliament Hakobyan said Heritage Party leader Raffi Hovannisian had been notified about his move well in advance. He left questions about reasons for his step without commentary, only saying that he had decided to step down as faction leader before the recent scandal around Postanjyan in the wake of her controversial question to President Serzh Sargsyan about his gambling habit at the PACE plenary session in Strasbourg on October 2.

Unlike a majority of Heritage members Hakobyan then was critical of Postanjyan’s behavior. Representatives of the ruling party in Armenia called her statement in Strasbourg slanderous and the parliament speaker threatened to expel her from the Armenian delegation to the PACE.

Postanjian, meanwhile, would not be drawn into speculation about the reasons for Hakobyan’s decision either.

Source: Armenia NowOriginial Article

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